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Photography of Wildlife & Natural Areas of Newfoundland, Native Flora.
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Attracts butterflies

Blue Flag Iris
(Iris versicolor)

#8 Blue Flag Iris

Flowers in early summer. Commonly grows in open marshes, wet meadows and along shorelines. Is said to attract hummingbirds* (rarely found in Nfld.) It is the french symbol of royalty, (the fleur-de-lys) and is said to signify perfection, light, and life. Having three "petals," the fleur-de-lis has also been used to represent the Holy Trinity and is used by Roman Catholics to symbolize the Virgin Mary.

                     



Attracts butterflies

Ox-Eye Daisy
(Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)

#9 ox-eye daisies

Commonly grows in open meadows and along roadsides, blooming in eary summer. It has long white ray petals around the outside that attract insect pollinators and bright yellow disc petals crowded in the center. Hugging the ground in dense patches.

                     



Common Dandelion
(Taraxacum palustris)


Common Dandelion

Grows profusely in open meadows. Dandelions are rich in vitamins, all of the plant is edible and as long been known for its medicinal value. Traditionally used to make wine, it was a cure for scurvy during the long winters.




Attracts wildlife

Cracker-berry
(Cornus canadensis)


Cracker-berry

Most commonly found in large mats in moist coniferous wood at the edge of clearings and clearcuts. The bright red berries that ripen in summer are important forage for wildlife but bland to the taste. Having natural therapeutic compounds, a tea made from its roots has been used to treat colic in infants. The leaves have also been burned and powdered to treat topical sores.




Pitcher Plant
(Sarracenia purpurea)


Pitcher Plant

Nflds provincial emblem is found in bogs and marshes throughout the province. This shot in mid august after the red petals had fallen to reveal the green umbrella shaped stigma. The lower tubular shaped leaves collect large amounts of rain water. Insects who drink from the plant are caught by bristles that point downward.


Pitcher Plant



White Cottongrass
(Eriophorum scheuchzeri)


White Cotton grass

Cotton Grass, grows prolifically in wet open areas. The more common tawny version is found on most bogs. It bears tassels of white flowers that look like tufts of silky cotton.




Fern


Fern

Several varities of ferns are found in Nfld. They prefer damp open woodlands and are often found in small clearings amongst the mature balsam fir forests. They usually grow to a height of about three feet forming a low canopy of leaf cover shading the ground to conserve moisture. They resemble a miniature forest of palmlike trees with long slender trunks and having interesting leaf patterns make good subjects for macro photography.




Attracts butterflies

Goldenrod


Goldenrod

Many insects can be found on goldenrod in late summer.The predators of those insects will be found there also. Large clusters of small yellow flowers add brilliant colors to the abandoned pastures where they are most likely to be found.

                     



Attracts butterflies

Purple-stemmed Aster
(Aster puniceus)


Purple-stemmed Aster

Numerous purple flowers grow on long deep purple stems to heights approaching six feet. Blooms during late summer in the damp ground around shorelines and wet areas.

                     



Attracts birds

Chuckley Pear
(Amelanchier spp. rosaceae)


Chuckly Pear

Found along woodland, road and stream edges, its large white flowers are conspicuous in June. Large, edible, dark red to purple pear shaped berries ripen in august. Known has service berry elswhere, it grows to a height of 3m.




Attracts wildlife

Trembling Aspen
(Populus tremuloidus)


#18 Aspens

Forming wide crowns of flaming yellow in mid october, it is one of the last trees to change color. The leaves tremble in the slightest breeze, hence the name "trembling" aspen. It is a favorite food for many animals including moose, beaver and ruffed grouse. The old growth aspens usually have an understory of young fir trees that provide additional food and cover.




Larch Tuckamore
(Larix laricina)


#35 Tablelands

A stunted version of the Larch tree whose growth is slowed by the mineral poor soil and strong winds on the exposed mountain side. Tuckamore is a Newfoundland term for the stunted trees that grow in barren & alpine areas & along the coast. Similar in appearance to krummholz found in the Alps, they can form an extensive mat of twisted trunks and limbs that are literally impenetrable and a bane to hikers. The tough elastic wood fibers bend without breaking. Only the densely packed rings can betray the true age of these bonsai-like dwarfs. A swept-back appearance indicates the direction of prevailing winds.




Attracts wildlife

Labrador Tea
(Ledum groenlandicum)


Labrador Tea

                                                                                               




Tall Meadow-Rue
(Thalictrum polygamum)


Tall Meadow-Rue

                                                                       




Horned Bladderwort
(Utricularia vulgaris)


Horned Bladderwort